Scrum for Small Teams with Multiple Stakeholders and Projects

  • Rather than forming a separate Scrum for each project, the team convenes as a single Scrum to discuss all projects, priorities, and available capacity. This eliminates the unwieldy and overly time-consuming process of juggling multiple Scrums for each project, which would inevitably involve many of the same people.
  • The team leader or other appropriate available person acts as the Product
    Owner,
    who also largely acts as the Scrum Master. Of course, in a perfect world, these are separate roles, and if the choice is to use an effective framework or not, many small teams combine these roles out of necessity.
    The Product Owner creates a Backlog of requirements for each project in
    collaboration with the key stakeholder/customer.
  • It is essential that the Product Owner, in collaboration and communication with her customers and the team, agree on each project’s priorities based on those that deliver the highest value. This communication must be current and transparent. When the customer has new requests or shifts priorities, it must be made clear to the customer that there will be a trade-off with other requests being delayed or de-prioritized altogether based on a finite team capacity.
  • Retrospectives: Typically set aside as a separate session to reflect on lessons learned that can guide the team’s success going forward, this team tends to weave this reflection into their various meetings, other weekly meetings, and Daily Stand-Ups.
  • Trello is a very clean, accessible way to set up a Kanban board to keep track of the status of your various projects.
  • Essential Scrum, by Kenny Rubin, is an excellent book to refresh yourselves on specific aspects, rituals, and roles of Scrum.

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